© 2019 Terry Swails

STEVE'S "WILD" WORLD OF WEATHER...

February 26, 2020

When I'm wondering about weather folklore and historical events this is the man I go to. With more than 50 years of statistical and observational research, he's the dude! When it comes to lunar cycles, woolly bear caterpillars, insects, bugs, and animals, he tracks them, records them, and establishes ties to weather patterns. He's a knowledgeable and interesting man. His name is Steve Gottschalk by way of Lowden, Iowa. I'm grateful to him for lending his unique perspective to the site. Steve's "wild" world of weather can be found every week right

here on TSwails.com. Take it away Steve!

 

THE FEBRUARY SNOWSTORM OF 1954:

 

After virtually no snowfall for the first 24 days of the month a winter storm swept southeastward across the state from the 25th thru the 27th. A very heavy band of snow fell from the N.W. into east-central Iowa.

The heaviest amounts fell in a swath from Marshalltown to east of Cedar Rapids. Several areas received record snowfall. The 16.7" of snow that fell at Cedar Rapids on the 26th is still a record? Their storm total was 17.8". Some other heavier amounts were:

 

Marshalltown - 15.0"

Belle Plaine - 14.0"

Vinton - 12.0"

Tipton - 11.3"

 

The amounts quickly tapered off to the north and the south with Des Moines receiving 3.9", Waterloo had 3.0" and Dubuque had 2.0". Traffic was impeded in the heavy snow areas.

 

THE MARCH FIRST QUARTER MOON AND PRECIPITATION:

My research has found that there is a 73% chance of some type of precipitation within 24 hours of the first quarter moon. It is on the 2nd of March this year.

 

THE MARCH LUNAR WEATHER FORECAST:

 

2nd - cold, rain/snow and wind.

4th - warmer, rain/snow and wind.

9th - cold, rain/snow and wind.

10th-11th - warmer, rain/snow and wind.

16th - variable temps., rain? and wind.

24th - warmer, rain/snow and wind.

31st - warmer, rain/snow and wind.

 

COYOTES AND THE WEATHER:

While taking my midnight weather observations I have seen coyotes out by my weather station or I hear them howling off in the distance. There are several weather folklore sayings concerning them

If a coyote howls at the moon in the winter, expect snow.

If a coyote howls, expect a storm.

If a coyotes howl during the winter, expect colder weather.

The coyotes were howling on the 24th.

 

That's all for now! On the "Wild" side of weather, I'm Steve Gottschalk

 

By the way, we do have a new edition of Weather School called Severe Weather 101 planned for April 4th. We have devoted the entire afternoon to the formation of severe storms with a strong emphasis on tornadoes. We'll do some simulations and take you inside several classic historic tornado outbreaks that have impacted Iowa and Illinois. I think you'll be really pleased with the sessions. We hope you can join us for all things severe weather! For all the details click on the banner below or contact Carolynswettston@yahoo.com.

 

 

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