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INTENSE WINTER STORM ARRIVES

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INTENSE WINTER STORM IN PROGRESS

After all the thought, speculation, and anticipation, the 2nd potent winter storm of the week is stirring up a ruckus around the region. Snow is falling and will continue occasionally into Saturday...heavy at times through Friday, the snow will be accompanied by strong winds that are expected to reach 45-50 mph. Significant blowing and drifting snow may produce whiteout conditions at times. Blizzard warnings cover much of my counties southwest of a line from Waterloo to the Quad Cities on to the SE. Elsewhere to the northeast, winter storm warnings are in effect for all but my far southern counties, where winter weather advisories are in place at the time of this posting. Alterations in the advisories are possible Friday as conditions unfold.

Significant travel issues are likely in all the region Friday. The Winter Severity index indicates major impacts which include dangerous to near impossible driving conditions where and when the storm is most intense. Some closures and disruptions are anticipated. Many schools will be shut down for the second time this week.

As it stands late Thursday night, much of the region has a good shot at 6-12 inches of snow, especially from about I-80 north. The far south should escape the worst of the snow, as mentioned previously. Here's the official NWS snowfall forecast.

The 0Z run of the HRRR (high resolution rapid refresh) does show a 61 mph 10 meter wind gust south of Rochelle, Ill. around 8:00am Friday morning. Wow! Some of that may be convectively induced.

Speaking of that, you can see all the lightning developing from Missouri and central Illinois south around 4:00am Thursday night. Some lightning is even approaching the Quad Cities from the SW. That is a sign the storm is really ramping up. If that convection finds its way into my area by daybreak, some 1-2 inch per hour snowfall rates can be expected.

With a snowy day ahead, I will end this post with the hopes of getting a few hours sleep. I will be back with you during the day to monitor any mesoscale changes that are common in the evolution of a major storm like this. Thanks for visiting the site. If you access and enjoy the content through Facebook, please hit the like button. Until next time, roll weather...TS

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